Hexagons dans l’Hexagone

23022014 Hexagons layout

Joined hexagons so far. At the moment I don’t think this’ll be the final layout, but you never know.

At the time of writing, I’m still on holiday in Normandy. We’ve been out and about doing stuff but it’s been nice to come back of an evening, throw some logs on the fire and pick up a project. And beat Chris at iPad scrabble, but that’s another story. Incidentally, Cherry Cottage at le Champ sous le Bois gets the JoAdvisor seal of approval. Great gîte, lovely owners and a very warm welcome. Good times.

It’s been a month for finishing things, or at least making some headway on works in progress. And this is probably the daddy of them all.

After I [finally] finished my basket weave scarf I turned my attention to the most mahoosive blanket I will ever make. I’m making a throw for a double bed from crocheted hexagons, and it’s going to take forever. Blankets are the perfect WIP project – you can do as much or as little as you like in one go and then leave it for a while. I’ve been picking this up and then leaving it for the best part of two years now. That said, it’s the perfect project for taking on holiday with you. Ultra portable and easy enough to do on auto pilot. We had a holiday duvet day with some DVDs on Thursday and it was excellent mindless crafting fodder.

This blanket is also the reason I’m not buying any more yarn until I’ve exhausted my stash. It’s made with a 4mm hook from Stylecraft DK acrylic, which is cheap, fully washable and comes in every colour under the sun, so if I get bored I can always switch to another colour and fool myself into thinking I’m doing something new. It also squeaks to high heaven.

23022014 Hexagons pile

This is the pile of hexagons to be sewn together. I counted 45… That’s a hell of a lot of ends to sew in…

Anywho, the current plan is to do strips of single colours, but arranged in shades from dark to light. This changes pretty regularly so the finished article may not quite turn out like that. The nice thing about crocheted hexagons (I think so anyway) is that the first round looks like a six-petal flower. I will not be too fussy about a couple of sneaky flowers in amongst all that block colour.

There are a couple of other things that please me about hexagons – whether they’re crocheted or otherwise:

1. Tessellation (I had to look up that spelling) – they all fit together so nicely! Simple things…

2. They’re worked in the round. I have noticed that some of my hexagons are bigger than others, particularly between different yarns. They might say that they’re DK weight, but they lie! However, because the hexagons are worked in the round they all have the same number of stitches so when you come to put them together, it’s easy to use mattress stitch to coax them into the right shape.

23022014 Joined hexagon close up

Check out that tessellation. And the mattress stitch. So, so pleasing.

3. Using mattress stitch to join them together produces beautiful results. I heart mattress stitch, almost as much as I love a French seam. It fits things together so nicely, and it’s practically invisible. And it’s so very easy. Mattress stitch, I salute you.

4. You can use your outside tail end to sew hexagons together, meaning minimum wastage. Just weave your yarn to the 2 ch corner sp and you’re onto a winner.

Right, now that love-in is over, here’s how to make your very own hexagon. Please tell me if I’ve gone wrong or it doesn’t work for you – it’s my first time annotating a crochet pattern and what works for me may be as clear as… A not very clear thing (apologies, I am still on holiday and several glasses of wine down).

Abbreviations:
Ch – chain
Ch sp – chain space
Sl st – slip stitch
Cl – cluster made from three trebles
Beg cl – beginning cluster made from two trebles
Dc – double crochet

Foundation chain: ch6, join with sl st
1. Ch 3, beg cl into ring, ch 3, *cl into ring, ch 3* repeat from * 5 times, join with sl st into top of beg cl (6 clusters made)
2. Sl st into first 3 ch sp, ch3, beg cl, ch 3, cl, ch 1, *cl in next 3 ch sp, ch 3, cl, ch 1* repeat from * 5 times, join with sl st into top of beg cl (12 clusters made)
3. Sl st into first 3 ch sp, ch 3, beg cl, ch 3, cl, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1, *cl into next 3 ch sp, ch 3, cl in same ch sp, ch 1, cl into next 1 ch sp, ch 1* repeat from * 5 times, join with sl st into top of beg cl (18 clusters made)
4. Sl st into first 3 ch sp, ch 3, beg cl, ch 3, cl, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1 *cl into next 3 ch sp, ch 3, cl in same 3 ch sp, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1* repeat from * 5 times, join with sl st into top of beg cl (24 clusters made)
5. Sl st into first 3 ch sp, ch 3, beg cl, ch 3, cl, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1, *cl into next 3 ch sp, ch 3, cl in same 3 ch sp, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1, cl in next 1 ch sp, ch 1*, repeat from * 5 times, join with sl st into top of beg cl (30 clusters made)
6. Ch 1, work 1 dc into the top of each cluster and each 1 ch sp. Work [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc] into each 3 ch sp. Join with sl st into first dc.
Fasten off yarn.

23022014 Hexagon mega close up

Here’s a close up so you can see what it’s supposed to look like, especially if my instructions aren’t up to much. Click on the picture to see a larger version.

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5 thoughts on “Hexagons dans l’Hexagone

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