Sew together for summer

I’m taking a new tack with Me Made May. I’m doing a daily post on Instagram (I’m @stuffjohasmade in case you’re interested) but on here I think I’ll just do a round up at the end of the month. Part of this is sheer laziness, but it’s also because we’ve invested in a fancy camera and the weather’s suddenly gone from grotty to glorious, so I’m suddenly a bit more interested in taking pictures.

First up, it’s my entry in the Sew Together for Summer contest. The competition is the brainchild of Sarah of Sew Sarah Smith (@sewsarahsmith), Monika (@rocco.sienna) and Suzy (@sewing_in_spain) These lovely ladies seem to have read my mind; all I am making at the moment is shirts and shirt dresses, and all you have to do to join in is whip up a shirt dress and share it on Instagram!

So for my entry, I decided to revisit an old faithful. I’m flying back to the UK next month for a wedding and obvs I need a new dress. I’m trying to sew things from my pattern stash rather than buying new, and the Sew Over It Vintage Shirt Dress seemed perfect for the task. I’ve made it a few times before, I know it fits nicely and it’s reasonably simple to sew up.

Front

This was taken on the roof of our building. It’s a bit of a sun trap and has awesome views over Lake Union to downtown Seattle. It’s basically what sold me on living there. And there’s a chicken coop up there too!

I picked up my fabric in Dry Goods Design in Seattle. It’s a lovely, buttery soft cotton lawn with a nice handle, and was a dream to sew with. I had no issues working with it, apart from when my machine decided that buttonholes were a bad idea. I had to unpick a few but they generally went off without too much bother. The buttons themselves are from another shop in Seattle, Nancy’s Sewing Basket. It’s a great shop with a brilliant range of dressmaking fabrics and notions, but it’s at the top of a massive hill (a bit of a feature in Seattle) so I’ll be visiting only when I have a good shopping list. Seriously, that hill is steep.

Back

The back. Plenty of space in that hem for bad wedding dancing. 

I’m pretty pleased with the finished result. The wedding’s in Norfolk and I’m hoping for some good weather. The dress feels light and airy, so should see me through the day right up to the point where we’re drunkenly singing Take That’s Never Forget at the end of the night. And isn’t that what weddings should be about? Dresses and drunkeness?

Collar close up

Here’s the collar. The fabric is so nice to work with that it was easy to get a crisp finish with my iron. 

Bonus top!

I… ermm… accidentally bought too much fabric and ended up with enough left over to make a bonus top! I managed to squeeze out a new version of my copied RTW top. I wore it this weekend when we visited Bainbridge Island for a spot of exploring and wine tasting. Mostly wine tasting. I had to have a nap when we got home.

Photo May 20, 13 28 55

Pre-wine tasting. 

Me Made May 2017, Week One

One of the things I particularly like about Me Made May this year is that it began on a Monday. That means I should (*should*) be able to post an update of the previous week on a Sunday evening. So here I am with my first MMM post on a Tuesday morning…

Anyway, this week I have mostly been wearing (and mostly eating):

1 Deer and Doe Chardon

Food: carbonara with miscellaneous pasta

Day One: my anchor print Deer & Doe Chardon. I love this skirt. It’s constantly in the wash because I wear it so much. I love the chambray and the way it presses So. Damn. Neatly. And it seems to go with everything.

2 By Hand London Zinnia

Food: we got back late from the cinema so dinner that day was a couple of pizza slices from the takeaway up the road. 

Day Two: a crinkly gingham By Hand London Zeena dress. I don’t think I’ve blogged this, but I originally made it for a christening last summer, which was cool but still church-appropriate. In recent months I’ve been wearing it to work and occasionally at the weekends.

3 Grainline Scout

Food: I’m obsessed with guacamole at the moment, so I whipped some up for wine and snacks on the roof. That’s Lake Union and downtown Seattle in the background. It’s a pretty sweet view. 

Day Three: A super awkward pose in my stripy Grainline Scout tee. I’m a big fan of this one. Dead easy to throw on, goes with everything etc.

4 Colette Zinnia sparkly

Food: Chris made it up to me with a packet of peanut butter M&Ms. 

Day Four: An as-yet-unblogged Colette Zinnia skirt. I finished this a couple of weeks ago and haven’t really had a chance to wear it till now as the weather has been awful. On the first really decent, warm day we’ve had, I was excited to take it out and wear it in the wild. But Chris decided that was the day to take my keys as well as his own, locking me in the house.

5 Sew Over It Alex shirt stars

Food: lamb pasanda at our local curry house. 

Days Five and Six: I wore my Sew Over It Alex shirt two days in a row, mainly because I wore it out to dinner for about two hours, so it was clean enough for another day’s wear. I’m loving this shirt at the moment, mostly cos the fabric is awesome – light and airy, and funky AF as well (as funky as I get, anyway). More of these will be in my life soon!

7 Self drafted butterfly top

Food:  pulled pork burger, fries and a bottle of water as I’m watching my figure (ahem). I swear my diet usually contains some fruit and veg. 

Day Seven: My self-drafted/copied Oasis top. I have plans for more of these, perhaps replacing the pleats with something else. It’s a useful basic top, especially under cardigans.

How’s your Me Made May going so far?

On the cutting table: May

I’ll be honest. Right now, I’d rather be outside. Seattle is gorgeous today – the sun’s out and it’s so warm that I’ve even got my legs out. I want to be out and about enjoying it, but Chris saw fit to swipe my keys this morning and I am stuck in the flat till he gets back this evening. Blogging it is.

I’ve got a small backlog of makes, but since they all need to be photographed let’s chat about my sewing plans for this month instead! As American bureaucracy is forcing me to be a lady of leisure, I think I can manage four projects this month:

I’ve been promising myself for ages that I’d make myself a basic, multi-purpose white shirt. I finally found the perfect medium-weight cotton shirting in District Fabrics (my new local fabric shop) so I’m getting on with making the Sew Over It Ultimate Shirt. It’s already half-finished, but I made a mistake with the sleeves that I haven’t corrected yet. Tomorrow’s job will be to get it finished!

Part of my Me Made May pledge was to finally do something with the sand washed silk that’s been sitting in my stash for the best part of a year. After seeing Leigh’s gorgeous version, I’ve plumped for the Alex shirt dress from the Sew Over It City Break ebook. I’m just wondering if I have enough fabric now – the pattern calls for 3m, and I have 2m, but I managed to eke my shirt version out of much less than the recommended length…

Sandwashed silk

This doesn’t do justice to the colour. It’s more of a petrol blue. 

Continuing my Sew Over It fangirling, I’m going to make the Vintage Shirt Dress for a friend’s wedding next month. I don’t have any fabric for this yet, but I’m looking forward to scouring the fabric shops of Seattle to find something. District Fabric is lovely, but there’s another good one in Capitol Hill and one in Queen Anne that I haven’t tapped yet. I feel a tour coming on!

Side

My last Vintage Shirt Dress. Can’t wait to wear this one again. 

Finally, I’m halfway through a mammoth quilt, inspired by this one I found on Pinterest. I’ve done the top so far, and since it’s queen-sized, I’m wondering how I’m going to fit it through my machine. I’ve bought a walking foot, and I’ve been watching a free Craftsy class about making my first quilt. I may have bitten off more than I can chew for a first quilt, but I’ve enjoyed picking up new skills so far.

Quilt top unfinished

One quilt top. It’s HUGE. 

In the time it’s taken me to write this, the weather’s turned on a sixpence. Clear blue skies to an almighty thunderstorm in less than an hour. Perhaps I’m better off locked in the flat after all…

Anyway, what’s on your cutting table this month?

My last-minute Me Made May pledge

I, Jo of stuffjohasmade.wordpress.com, sign up as a participant of Me Made May 2017. I endeavour to wear handmade clothes at least five days a week for the duration of May.

Hola! Just ducking in before the sign up deadline to say I’m taking part in Me Made May this year (check out the So Zo blog for the details on how to take part). I’ve stuck to the same pledge as 2016 as my work wardrobe is largely out of action while I wait for my US work permit so I’m limited to casual wear. I suppose I *could* wear my work clothes if I wanted to, but I’d much rather be comfortable. And anyway, I think sticking to five days of me-made casual clothes is a decent challenge for my current circumstances. 

As a side challenge, and because I have a bit of time on my hands at the moment, I’m going to do something with the 2m of sand-washed silk I’ve had in my stash for a bit too long. Question is, what should I do with it? The current contenders are either a rather luxurious Alex shirt dress from the Sew Over It City Break e-book, or their pussybow blouse, both of which I have in PDF format… The dress would be for general wear, whereas the blouse would be more of an office-to-bar sort of thing, so wouldn’t get the immediate wear. I may be talking myself in to making the dress here – what do you guys think?!

My other hope for Me Made May is that I get back to blogging a bit more. I’ll try and do a MMM round up each week but I’ll also share some of my recent makes. I have the time; I should be writing. 

Are you taking part in MMM this year? Are you using it as an excuse to get something done? 

Going loco for Coco

Hello from Seattle! After weeks of packing, storing, tipping and charity shopping, Chris and I have finally left the UK for the US. I arrived on Sunday afternoon (Chris has been here a week longer), and I’m a little jet lagged, but otherwise happy to be here. I haven’t done a great deal yet, but I have managed to set up a bank account, made a trip to the supermarket and tried out the local buses. I’m still without a sewing machine but in the meantime I’ve got an embroidery project on the go to scratch my creative itch. More on that another time…

Anyway, what with moving continents and everything, I’ve got a little bit of a backlog of finished garments to share. Before we had our visas approved I had quite a productive January, and one of the results of that was a new Coco dress.

Coco dress front

So Boden. I should be pushing a pram around Clapham or something…

I’d had this red and white stripy interlock jersey in my stash for too long, mainly because I’m a bit scared of knits (worried that they’ll stretch blah blah blah). As you may remember I’m not at my happiest when sewing knits, but I wanted to give it another go, this time with the Tilly and the Buttons Coco dress. Holding the pattern pieces up to my shoulders showed me that the dress version would be a bit too short for my liking so I had to add a couple of inches to make it sit on the knee. I also graded it out so it would fit my hips nicely. Turns out I needn’t have bothered – I ended up taking it in a fair bit from hip to hem as it just seemed that there was too much fabric in the skirt.

Taking it in did the trick fit-wise, but it did knock my stripe-matching off a bit. I’d done everything to make those stripes match up – cut the pieces on a single layer, pinned them to within an inch of their life, etc – but now they’re ever-so-slightly off. No matter though; it’s not enough for anyone to notice.

Coco dress side

Prob not the best pic for looking at the stripe matching, but they are just off down the side seams. 

Despite my fears, I’m happy to report that this dress came together really easily. I used a zigzag stitch for the seams, but finished the neckline and hems with a twin needle as I think it looks more professional than using zigzag throughout as recommended.

Coco dress neckline

The dress is great, if a little Boden catalogue. It’s done me proud at work and I’ve had some lovely comments from people. The fabric is super-soft and snuggly, and the fit is loose enough to feel comfortable, even after a big dinner. It’s a quick make too – a morning’s work – so there may well be more on the horizon. Once I get a machine.

Coco dress back

Hmmm… Potential swayback issues? 

 

Too-rye-ay

Does anyone else think of Dexy’s Midnight Runners when they think of dungarees? I haven’t worn a pair myself since the mid-90s when I had some short dungarees for the summer. [Un]fortunately I have no photos, but I loved those things – they were so comfortable and I thought I was so cool wearing them. I’m not sure I could carry off proper dungarees anymore but a dress version is a happy compromise.

Tilly and the Buttons’ Cleo dress came along just at the right time. It’s an easy-fitting dress with two length options and instructions for buckles or buttonholes. I’ve seen loads of lovely versions over the internet, and not just in traditional denim. When Tilly released a new batch of kits, I snapped one up in aubergine needlecord.

front

The kit came with everything you need to make your Cleo – pattern, thread, interfacing, shiny silver buckles and enough fabric to make one dress. The fabric is seriously nice too. So very soft. Before cutting it out I must have spent a good 15 minutes just stroking it… Don’t judge me. I was… ermmm… testing for the nap…

Anyway, the pattern comes with Tilly’s trademark clear and detailed instructions. I went for the longer version and had no problems sewing it up – it’s a great pattern for a beginner, but a nice quick sew for someone with more projects under their belt. Proving every day’s a school day, I did pick up a new skill! I’d never done a bar tack before and never really realised that it’s just a row of really tight zigzags. Mine’s at the top of the front split for reinforcement.

As dungarees have a relaxed fit, I was confident that my standard adjustments to TATB patterns would be ok. I’m a 4 on top, but according to my measurements I should be a 7 on the bottom. I graded it out as normal but the finished article made me look like I was wearing jodhpurs, so I unpicked and resewed. I’ll try grading to a 6 next time instead.

pocket

Difficult to see in this pic, but I can assure you there is a painstakingly stitched pocket on this dress. 

This was a really satisfying sew and I’ve had a lot of lovely comments about this one (apart from my dad, who asked me why I was wearing overalls *sigh*). From tracing the pattern (normally the part that takes me ages, mainly because I find it so very tedious) to trying on the finished article, this took me about four hours. I can see more on the horizon too. It doesn’t take up much fabric – less than 1.25m for the longer length dress – so it’s good for stash busting. I’ve already bought some dark blue denim and the buckles for my next version, though this time I think I’ll give contrasting top stitching a go.

That’ll have to wait though, cos I’m about two weeks away from the big move and I am mainly spending time sorting out my life right now. That and my machine and overlocker went into storage last week. I am itching to do some more making but I’ll have to restrain myself until I get to the other side of the pond.

What’s on your sewing table at the moment?

straps-back

Straps!

Getting ruthless with my pattern stash

I’m not much of a hoarder, but like most I do accumulate stuff at a rate of knots. Moving continent has given us a great chance to have a bit of a purge and if I can’t take it, it’s either going in storage or to the Tooting Oxfam.

As we’re going to be travelling light I can’t take much sewing stuff. I’ll be buying a new machine in the US  and I’ve been thinking about what equipment I can take from my sewing box to get me started. This means some pretty straightforward decisions, but I’ve had to be ruthless with my many paper patterns.  The ones I know I’ll never make went straight to the charity shop. Then I had to choose what would make the trip and what would go into storage. I limited myself to taking ten essential and versatile printed patterns, with the aim of creating a capsule wardrobe.

So what made  the list?

  1. Sew Over It Vintage Shirt Dress – great office wear in the winter and makes a wonderful summer dress in cotton lawn
  2. By Hand London Anna dress – multi-purpose dress that works in all the fabrics, plus the instructions are so clear on inserting an invisible zip. I forget how to do it every time, but the BHL ladies help me through.5dafceed-c554-42e6-845d-6a2dd38025cel0001
  3. Tilly and the Buttons Cleo dress – I made one of these the other day and now I want more! Watch out for a post on this coming soon.
  4. Deer & Doe Chardon skirt – I wear my Chardons all the time – in the office and at home. You will be seeing more!Anchor chardon front
  5. Sewaholic Hollyburn skirt – I’ve worn my previous versions of this into the ground. Need more.
  6. Tilly and the Buttons Arielle skirt – this is purely a work skirt for me, but I love it as it’s so different to my usual fit n’ flare skirts.Arielle pose
  7. Sew Over It Ultimate Shirt – I’m taking the class at the moment and I’m pretty pleased with my progress. It’s a fitted shirt that will work best for smart/office wear.
  8. Grainline Archer shirt – it’s been in my stash for ages. It’ll be awesome for all sorts of casual wear.
  9. Tilly and the Buttons Agnes top – I haven’t made this one either, but it’s a wardrobe basic, and the online class will hold my hand as I get to grips with jersey.
  10. My copied Oasis top – I’ve made loads of these, but they’re so useful to have for layering under cardies.50s pleated skirt front 1
  11. Simple Sew Shannon trousers (free with Love Sewing magazine in Sept/Oct last year) – I haven’t made these yet but I will need some pants, and these wide-leg trousers will suit my eastern European shotputter’s legs quite nicely.
  12. By Hand London Victoria blazer – because I need something to throw over the top of everything.

So I may have gone slightly over my target of ten, but I’ll just have to sit on my suitcase to get it closed (and let’s not talk about the bonus home décor patterns I ripped out from some sewing magazines. They totally don’t count).

How about you? If you could only take a few patterns with you to a new place, which ones would you choose?

Cock-a-doodle-hen-do

Happy Sunday all! I’m taking a break from a massive clear out to bring you today’s post. We’re having a spring clean because on Friday we went to the American Embassy in London and had our visas approved! We now have around about a month to get our stuff together and get out to Seattle, which means a mad rush to sort things out.

Anyway, I’m here today on much more frivolous business. A few weeks ago, I had a rather belated hen do. Since Chris and I went from proposal to marriage in the space of six weeks, I didn’t really have time to have a hen do, so I decided to do it after the fact instead. I gave my bridesmaid a few stipulations (karaoke, a drink or two, and absolutely nothing that indicates we’re on a hen do – e.g. No willy straws or fluffy pink stetsons), but otherwise she had free rein. I was in the dark about what was happening until the day itself, and Gillian was being quite cagey about the dress code, so I figured I’d need something that would take me from day to night with ease.

The Alex shirt from the Sew Over It City Break e-book seemed to fit the bill nicely. I am having a major SOI fan girl moment. All I seem to make at the moment is their patterns. They do fit me nicely, and the patterns are all things I want to wear, so why not?

alex-front

The concept of the City Break book really appeals to me. I’ve been thinking about capsule wardrobes for a little while now, and with an impending move abroad, it sounds like an appealing idea. While I like all the patterns (apart from the Mia jeans – they’re a bit skinny for me), the Alex shirt was the one that stood out for me. It’s loose fitting, can be lengthened into a dress and has rolled up sleeves. These details make it a nice introduction to sewing shirts without too much hassle – no collar stand and no fiddly cuffs.

My Alex is made out of a lovely drapey rayon I’ve had in my stash for so long I can’t remember where it came from. I love the drape of rayon, but it can be difficult to cut out as it moves around a lot, so I cracked out the spray starch to help it stay put.

The pattern and instructions were really easy to follow. The only bit I found tough to get my head around was the enclosed yoke. I couldn’t work out how to twist it so that the inner yoke could be stitched nicely all in one and turned through. I got a bit confused and ended up with a Möbius strip instead of a yoke several times, so after one bout of unpicking I decided I’d pin and test first, which saved my tears.

alex-yoke

The fabric is quite busy, but I assure you this is the yoke and the pleat in the body.

My only other criticism of the instructions was about attaching the collar. It has you out the collar on before you sew the side seams. This struck me as a bit odd and turned things into a bit of a faff when you have slippery fabric flying about everywhere.

alex-front-close-up

The collar and almost invisible patch pockets. I also didn’t bother doing buttonholes as I can fit it over my head without any bother. 

The fit’s pretty good. It’s supposed to be loose and relaxed, so I had plenty of space in a straight size 12 to fit my child-bearing hips (a pretty standard adjustment for me). I started doing the sleeve tabs but when I sewed them on, I realised they were too thin and positioned too far down the sleeve for my liking. I like rolled up sleeve to sit in the crook of my elbow, but these were more bracelet length which would just annoy me. So I left them off, and made a note to draft a thicker tab next time round.

alex-side

So how was the hen do? Well, I got my karaoke but I was also made the leader of a routine to I Wanna Dance With Somebody (video of which I hope will not see the light of day). We went out for dinner and then went for drinks and table football in Bar Kick in Shoreditch. I had rather a lot to drink but I was also the table football champion of my own hen do along with my friend Joanna. I don’t think they let us win…?

Big life news

I’ve been quiet for a good while on here basically because it’s been all change since I last checked in in September… Last time we met, I was merrily sewing up door stops and cushion covers as part of getting our flat ready for sale. We had grand plans of buying a house in Walthamstow (market proximity was a plus) but that all came to a bit of an abrupt halt.

A few days before we were due to put the flat on the market Chris was sort of made redundant. I say sort of, because his company were shutting down their London office and moving operations to America. He had three options: find another role in the company in London, redundancy or move to Seattle with the job. We had a chat about it, went to visit Seattle for a week, decided we really liked it and opted to move out there! We’re currently in the middle of the visa process, and all things being equal, we expect to be flying out by the end of February. Sounds pretty intense, eh? You don’t know the half of it!

My being able to move to America with Chris and staying there legally is really dependent on us being married. So, Chris popped the question on our anniversary at the end of October and six weeks later we got hitched! It was always going to happen anyway, and I’m informed that he had the ring for several months before he proposed but this sped things up considerably. We decided to have a quick and quiet wedding in Merton registry office in London, with a buffet and drinks at his parents’ house afterwards – just immediate family and friends.

If the stress of organising a wedding in six weeks wasn’t enough, I decided to make my dress too! I was already doing the 1940s wrap dress class at Sew Over It anyway, so I thought why not just make that my wedding dress? It made sense to me – I had dedicated class time to get it done, I had fitting help and (most importantly) it took a massive headache out of finding THE dress. And the teacher, Dominique, didn’t freak out when I told her the occasion!

I managed to get most of it done in class time, with just hemming to do by the end of it which I did while Chris was on his stag weekend. I was really pleased with how it turned out – while some bits were quite fiddly (the neck line binding in particular), it came together quite nicely, which is pretty standard for Sew Over It patterns. It’s a good job too, since this is probably the most important dress I’ll ever wear!

The wedding itself was lovely, and despite my dad tripping down the stairs as he walked me down the aisle and a bit of a mix up with the rings, it all went smoothly. We couldn’t have done it without the help of our family and friends. Chris’ family really pulled out the stops and transformed their house for the day, and my bridesmaid Gillian was brilliant at being decisive, and listening to my rants about cake arrangements (that’s another, long, story). We’re both really happy and looking forward to new adventures!

Anyway, here’s some pictures!

vows

Vows

just-married

Just married. Prob the best view of the front of the dress that isn’t obscured by my bouquet

rings-and-flowers

Rings n’ flowers. I loved my bouquet – the florist got really excited that I was wearing lavender and not ‘Cadbury’s purple’. I think she’d seen a lot this year… 

bridesmaids

Me and my bridesmaids, Anne and Gillian

confetti

Confetti: can’t speak for Chris, but it was so windy that not one bit of it landed on me!

car

Oh I felt so classy in that car! Here I am desperately trying to keep my dress closed in the breeze. 

cutting-the-cake

toast

I love this photo – so much going on in the background.

photos

Getting papped. 

Next level scrap busting

Hello from the living room! It’s chaos in the flat this weekend – we’re gearing up to put it on the market so we’re having a few jobs done to make it look a bit more presentable. As I speak there’s a builder outside installing a new front gate. The kitchen, where I usually sew, is currently a bomb site with all the building materials spread out, so I’ve been sewing in the living room today, in amongst all the furniture from the study which is being replastered.

Anyway, you know when you have some fabric that you love so much you can’t bear to chuck any of it away? I had that with some home décor fabric I got from Ikea last week . I got two metres with the intention of making some cushion covers so that everything vaguely matches in the living room (those estate agent photos are on my mind!). I won’t bore you with the cushion covers, but I ended up with loads of little scraps that I was determined to use.

cushions

I don’t normally put all my cushions on one sofa but the living room is such a mess at the moment this is the only clear space there is!

Ever since I’ve been with Chris he’d been using dumbbell weights to prop the door open. It’s a bit of a cliché to have unused exercise equipment lying around the house, but it’s not the best impression to give to potential buyers. This month’s Love Sewing magazine has a pattern for a doorstop that’s basically a cuboid with and handle. It only takes a small amount of fabric, so perfect for scraps.  It has an outer shell with a zip in the bottom, then you fill a lining bag with 1.5kgs of rice to create the weight.

bottom-zip

The zip. 

Of the scraps I had, I could only do the handles in single pieces – all the other pieces had to be sewn together to fit the pattern. It was a bit of a jigsaw with at least one of the pattern pieces using five separate scraps. I don’t think it matters all that much with the blue and white fabric as the print is random enough for the joins to be largely unnoticeable.

patchwork-pieces

Dedication to using my scraps, right there. 

The instructions were well written and easy to follow. I had a brief brain fart with inserting the side panels, but once I’d got round that, it all made sense. In short, the pattern markings are important as they tell you where to turn corners! I did ignore the instructions for the lining bag though. It suggested filling it with rice/dried kidney beans/gravel before sealing it with some hand stitching. For a bag that no-one is EVER going to see, I wasn’t going to bother making it look pretty, so I just did a line of machine stitching at the top and stuffed the lining into the outer. Some things just aren’t worth bothering with, are they?

lining-bag

One of the two lining bags I made. The other one is also a bit of a patchwork affair. 

I ended up making two of these, but I only really had enough fabric for one and a half, so I had to raid my scraps some more. Luckily I had some lightweight blue denim which works quite nicely, and the inner bags were also from the scraps bin (you might recognise it from the laundry bag I made the other week). It’s all good value for money. I spent £10 on the fabric, £1.98 on the zips, and £1.80 on three kilos of rice – I’d say less than £14 for five cushion covers and two doorstops is pretty good!

blue-and-white

Number 1 matches those cushions nicely. 

They’re both now in situ in the living room and bedroom, and I’m happy that the living room is a bit more tied together (OK, matchy-matchy). Now, does anyone want to buy a flat in Colliers Wood?

denim-and-patches

Number 2 is more of a mish-mash.